Can I put this on my highlander?

Yes.

 This is an example of a starter on a Highlander. Joe Reiss gained clearance between rear wheel fender for starter by putting a 3/4 shim under the rear motor mount, which made the motor sit upright.

This is an example of a starter on a Highlander. Joe Reiss gained clearance between rear wheel fender for starter by putting a 3/4 shim under the rear motor mount, which made the motor sit upright.


What is the transmission set back bracket? 

Take note of the transmission set back bracket. Lower rear hole until top of bushing is at the bottom of rear hole. Drill a new hole if your bracket does not have 2 ( early kits only had 1 hole on rear side).

 


How do I mount to a 1957 eagle? 

Example of setting transmission back for starter clearance. Recess fender for transmission. Also Fender can be moved back slightly to achieve clearance. Low exhaust pipe on unit so heavy duty battery can be mounted under luggage rack/seat area.

1957 fig 1.jpg

Will I need additional parts?  

Only on the 1958 Eagle. You'll need to put a spacer (not included in kit) 3/8 to 1/2 in. between frame bar & fender as pictured.

1958 fig 2.jpg

How do I get the flywheel off?

On a Cushman Husky or Silver Eagle engine the flywheel is removed by striking the end of the crankshaft with a ball peen hammer. Before doing this you must remove the flywheel nut and lock washer. If this nut was installed to the old Cushman specification it was tightened to 70 foot-pounds. It is going to take considerably more than that to get it off.

The best way to remove the nut is to use a ½ or larger breaker bar and a 1-1/16 socket that is deep enough to clear the fins. While someone else holds the flywheel by it’s perimeter carefully strike the end of the breaker bar with a wood mallet. One or two blows should loosen the nut. Do not attempt keep the shaft from turning by jamming any part of the flywheel or clutch with a crowbar or similar object. After the nut and lockwasher have been removed, screw a knock off tool on the end of the crankshaft threads, part number 112015 for the OMC engine or 809315 for the Cast Iron engine. The knock off tool is designed to prevent any damage to the crankshaft threads. If you attempt to remove the flywheel without it or try to substitute a nut for the tool you may damage the crankshaft. Tap the tool lightly while tightening it to be sure it is seated as far down as it will go. It will help if you have a second person to put a little outward force it on the flywheel. Now strike the knock off tool smartly and squarely with a large ball peen hammer and the flywheel should pop loose. If it does not come loose with the first strike be sure that the knock off tool is still very tight on the shaft before trying again. Be very careful when you do this because if you strike a fin it will break off. When you are ready to reinstall the flywheel first tighten the nut as far as you can with the breaker bar while your helper holds the flywheel by its perimeter. You can torque it to about 25 foot-pounds or more this way. The best way to tighten it the rest of the way is to purchase a strap wrench that can hold the flywheel around its perimeter. One person holds the strap wrench, the other torques the nut to about 60 Ft/Lbs. The original Cushman method is to strike the end of the breaker bar lightly with the hammer to tighten the nut a little more. If you do it this way you just have to use your best judgment and shoot for about 50 to 60 foot-pounds. A couple good strikes should do the job. Do not over do it because over tightening the nut may cause the flywheel to crack. Also be very careful with the mallet because you do not want to lose a helper or break off a flywheel fin.

 1958 Eagle - View from right side - Installation Completed.  Belt guard & chair guard have been raised to clear pulley.

1958 Eagle - View from right side - Installation Completed.  Belt guard & chair guard have been raised to clear pulley.